Michigan News Digest

Here’s a look at how AP’s general news coverage is shaping up today in Michigan. Questions about today’s coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the AP-Detroit bureau at 800-642-4125 or 313-259-0650 or apmichigan@ap.org. For up-to-the minute information on AP’s coverage, visit Coverage Plan at newsroom.ap.org.

A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories, digests and digest advisories will keep you up to date. All times are Eastern.

TOP STORY:

ELECTION 2020-MICHIGAN

LANSING, Mich. — Michigan House Speaker Lee Chatfield says President Donald Trump didn’t ask the state’s Republican lawmakers to “break the law” or “interfere” with the election during a meeting at the White House. Chatfield was among several GOP legislators who met with Trump on Friday, amid Trump’s longshot efforts to block Biden’s win. Chatfield’s comments to Fox News about the highly unusual meeting came a day before canvassers plan to meet on whether to certify Joe Biden’s 154,000-vote victory. Michigan’s election agency has recommended that the Nov. 3 results — including Biden’s victory — be certified by the canvassing board, which has two Democrats and two Republicans. By David Eggert. SENT: 385 words.

ELECTION 2020-BLACK VOTER SUPPRESSION

DETROIT — President-elect Joe Biden was in part powered to victory in Michigan, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and Georgia by Black voters, many of them concentrated in cities such as Detroit, Philadelphia and Atlanta where he received a significant share of their support. Since Election Day, President Donald Trump and his allies have sought to expose voter fraud that simply does not exist. The strategy could erode Black voters’ trust in elections. Voting-rights advocates say they stand ready to beat back any efforts to water down the Black vote. But fears persist that Trump’s allies will undermine democracy and disenfranchise Black Americans and other voters of color. By Aaron Morrison, Kat Stafford and Christine Fernando. SENT: 1,100 photos, photo.

RHODES SCHOLAR

UNDATED — The process to elect the U.S. Rhodes Scholars for 2021 has been completed virtually for the first time as the coronavirus pandemic sweeps across the globe. The Rhodes Trust announced the 32 winners early Sunday, including one from the University of Michigan. The group includes 22 students of color. Ten are Black, tying the record for most Black students elected in a single year. Nearly 1,000 applicants were endorsed by 288 different colleges and universities to study at Oxford University in England next year. Southern Connecticut State University and the University of California, Santa Cruz, have winners for the first time. The winners include 17 women, 14 men and one nonbinary person. SENT: 500 words, photos.

AROUND THE STATE:

RELIGION BLACK CLERGY-COVID

NEW YORK — Black clergy leaders are joining forces with the United Way of New York City for a new initiative designed to combat the coronavirus’ outsized toll on African Americans through ramped-up testing, contact tracing and treatment management. The effort, with begins with seven-figure funding, aims to harness the on-the-ground influence of church leaders to circulate resources that can better equip Black Americans in safeguarding against and treating the virus. It will begin in five major cities with a goal of further expansion and ultimately reaching 400,000 people. By Elana Schorr. SENT: 550 words, photos.

VIRUS OUTBREAK-RESTAURANTS

LANSING, Mich. — A Michigan mandate that has forced dine-in restaurants and bars to close for the second time this year is getting a mixed response from industry leaders that worry the move could hurt businesses. The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services announced the new order earlier this month. MLive.com reports that state law allows the agency to prohibit gatherings during an epidemic. The ban, which went into effect Wednesday, will last for three weeks. Some industry leaders say the ban won’t prevent people from getting COVID-19, while others think it is worth closing to help the state. SENT: 330 words.

IN BRIEF:

—GAS PIPELINE-MICHIGAN: Michigan’s Public Service Commission has approved Consumers Energy’s application to build a 36-inch natural gas pipeline.

SPORTS:

FBN—LIONS PANTHERS

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The Panthers (3-7), marred in a five-game losing streak, will again be without running back Christian McCaffrey and could be without quarterback Teddy Bridgewater when they host the Lions. Detroit (4-5) is looking to build on last week’s win over Washington. By Steve Reed. UPCOMING. 700 words, photos. Game starts at 1 p.m. ET

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