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PFAS CONTAMINATION

Scientist discusses early report on PFAS contamination

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) — A state scientist says he made recommendations six years ago to his superiors on how to limit exposure in Michigan to contamination from industrial compounds known as PFAS, but received no immediate feedback.

Department of Environmental Quality researcher Robert Delaney said Tuesday during a summit of federal, state and local health and environmental officials in Grand Rapids that he sent then-director Dan Wyant a report in 2012.

Wyant resigned in late 2015 . The report was made public last year.

The state has since created a response team to address the issue and test water supplies.

Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances have been used in firefighting foam and other products. They can get into drinking water when products containing the chemicals are spilled onto the ground or in lakes or rivers.

WIND ENERGY-UP

UP wind-farm critics submit signatures to force election

L’ANSE TOWNSHIP, Mich. (AP) — Critics of a wind-energy project in the Upper Peninsula have submitted petition signatures to put the issue to voters.

Dozens of turbines are being proposed for L’Anse Township in Baraga (BEAR’-uh-guh) County, roughly 230 miles northwest of the Mackinac Bridge. The area has some of the highest points in Michigan.

The Daily Mining Gazette reports that a group called Friends of the Huron Mountains collected more than 400 signatures from township residents to force an election that could overturn zoning changes. The zoning changes were approved by township officials in October and could clear the way for the Summit Lake Wind Project.

If enough signatures are certified, an election would be held next year.

WOMEN-OUTDOORS PROGRAM

Registration opens for Michigan women’s outdoor program

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Registration has opened for the winter “Becoming an Outdoors Woman” program in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula.

The state Department of Natural Resources sponsors the annual event, which is scheduled for Feb. 22-24 in Marquette County.

It’s for women ages 18 and older who want to improve their outdoors skills in a relaxed, noncompetitive atmosphere.

Instruction is available in activities such as cross-country skiing, archery, winter camping, ice fishing, fly tying, winter biking, wilderness first aid, wood-burning and snowshoeing.

Participants stay at the Bay Cliff Health Camp near Big Bay.

The $200 registration fee includes all food and lodging, plus most equipment and supplies. Scholarships are available on a limited basis.

MOTT FOUNDATION-CHIEF EXECUTIVE

Longtime Mott Foundation CEO passing reins to son

FLINT, Mich. (AP) — The Charles Stewart Mott Foundation has selected the great-grandson of its founder to be chief executive.

Longtime CEO William White announced Tuesday he is passing the leadership reins to his son, Ridgway. The younger White has been president of the Flint-based foundation since 2015.

William White, who joined the foundation in 1969, says in a message he will serve without pay as board chairman. His grandfather, C.S. Mott, launched the philanthropic organization in 1926.

Ridgway White joined in 2002 as an intern and became a program assistant two years later.

The Mott Foundation says it has distributed more than $3 billion since its founding and holds roughly that amount in assets. It committed up to $100 million over five years to help Flint recover from its lead-contaminated water crisis.

OFF-DUTY OFFICER SLAIN

Insanity defense may be sought for man in officer’s slaying

(Information from: Times Herald, http://www.thetimesherald.com)

PORT HURON, Mich. (AP) — A lawyer may pursue an insanity defense for a man charged in the fatal shooting of an off-duty Port Huron police officer.

The Times Herald of Port Huron reports Tuesday that court documents show attorney Bill Colovos has filed a motion to have Joshua Bauman undergo examination for criminal responsibility at the Center for Forensic Psychiatry.

A hearing is scheduled Monday.

Lt. Joel Wood was slain in August while visiting a woman in Clyde Township. Bauman’s estranged wife and a neighbor were wounded. Wood was 45 and had been a Port Huron officer for more than two decades.

Bauman was captured in suburban Detroit. He is charged with first-degree murder, attempted murder and other crimes.

Port Huron is about 55 miles (88 kilometers) northeast of Detroit.

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ISLE ROYALE-WOLF DIES

Wolf taken to Isle Royale National Park this fall dies

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — A gray wolf relocated this fall from the Minnesota mainland to Isle Royale National Park has died.

The male wolf was among four taken to the Lake Superior island park from the Grand Portage Chippewa reservation. It’s part of a multi-year effort to rebuild the Isle Royale wolf population, which has fallen sharply in recent years.

Officials said Tuesday that the male wolf’s collar had been sending false mortality signals since it was released on the island, despite evidence the animal was alive and on the move.

But late last month, the collar indicated the wolf was no longer roaming. Crews tracked him down and found his body. The cause of death wasn’t immediately clear. A necropsy was planned.

Officials say other three relocated wolves are doing well.

FLINT AIRPORT STABBING

Montreal man convicted of terrorism for US airport attack

FLINT, Mich. (AP) — A man who drove to Michigan from Montreal and stabbed an airport police officer has been convicted of terrorism and other crimes.

It was a slam dunk for federal prosecutors: Witnesses saw Amor Ftouhi (ah-MOOR’ fuh-TOO’-ee) attack Lt. Jeff Neville at the Flint airport and wrestled him to the ground.

Ftouhi was convicted of three crimes Tuesday. He’s a Tunisian who was living in Montreal at the time of the June 2017 stabbing.

Investigators say Ftouhi wanted to stab Neville , take his gun and start shooting people in the airport. He legally drove into the U.S. at Champlain, New York, and arrived in Flint five days later. He tried but failed to buy a gun at a gun show and instead bought a large knife.

Neville survived.

BLACK TEEN SHOOTING

Michigan man who shot at black teen gets 4 years in prison

PONTIAC, Mich. (AP) — A white retired firefighter has been sentenced to at least four years in prison for shooting at a black teenager who came to his suburban Detroit home asking for directions to school.

Jeffrey Zeigler apologized before he was sentenced Tuesday in Oakland County court. A jury convicted him last month of assault and a gun crime.

Fourteen-year-old Brennan Walker wasn’t hurt. He told police he missed a school bus on April 12 and knocked on Zeigler’s door in Rochester Hills after getting lost. He ran after seeing a man inside the house grab a gun.

The 53-year-old Zeigler says he woke up to his wife’s screams and that she believed someone was trying to break into their home.

He’ll be eligible for parole after four years.

INFANT DEATH-MURDER

Woman pleads guilty in death of infant in hot Michigan home

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) — A western Michigan woman charged in the death of her 6-month-old son who was left in a car seat in a sweltering home has pleaded guilty to second-degree murder.

Twenty-three-year-old Lovily Johnson entered the plea Tuesday. An agreement with prosecutors says she’s expected to get a minimum sentence of 15-25 years in prison. Sentencing is Jan. 10.

A Kent County judge declared a mistrial in September after five days of jury deliberations didn’t reach a verdict.

The Wyoming, Michigan, woman was charged with child abuse and first-degree murder. Police say Noah Johnson was ignored for parts of three days last year in an attic bedroom that was 90 degrees Fahrenheit (32 degrees Celsius).

Johnson’s attorney has said she was overwhelmed by being a young mother and caring for other children.

MAYO CLINIC-DONATION

Mayo Clinic receives its largest gift ever

ROCHESTER, Minn. (AP) — A corporate strategist from Michigan has given Mayo Clinic its largest gift ever — $200 million.

The Rochester-based medical center announced Tuesday that its School of Medicine will be named for the philanthropist, Jay Alix, of Birmingham, Michigan. He has also been named to the Mayo Clinic Board of Trustees.

Alix says his interest in Mayo began in the 1980s when he studied its business model as he was creating what would become AlixPartners, his consulting firm. The Alix Foundation has given Mayo millions of dollars in recent years toward improving its clinical care. The latest record gift is aimed at helping prepare the medical school for the future and make medical education more affordable.