Here is the latest Michigan news from The Associated Press at 3:40 p.m. EDT

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — A judge has rejected a challenge to Michigan’s online request system for absentee ballots. Critics claim the online option violates Michigan law, which requires a signed application. But Judge Cynthia Stephens says critics waited too long to seek an injunction and “merely theorize” that fraud might occur. The secretary of state started online absentee voter applications in June. Signatures on file for a driver’s license or a state ID are good enough to get a ballot. More than 74,000 voters have submitted online applications for an absentee ballot.

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) — Federal prosecutors are asking a judge to give them an extra 40 days until mid-December to seek a grand jury indictment in an alleged scheme to kidnap Michigan’s governor. Prosecutors say they’re sorting through evidence, including explosive-device components. The components and firearms could lead to additional charges. Authorities allege members of two anti-government paramilitary groups plotted the kidnapping of Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, a Democrat. Six men are charged in federal court. A judge previously said there is enough evidence for prosecutors to seek an indictment by the first week of November. Prosecutors say defense attorneys have raised no objections to an extension. 

DETROIT (AP) — A commission has released the 47,000-student Detroit Public Schools from more than a decade of state financial oversight, restoring full control of the district’s finances to the city’s elected school board. The Detroit Financial Review Commission on Monday approved waivers handing control back to the district. The last time the district was fully in charge was in 2009 before a series of state-appointed emergency managers were installed with the directive to fix a district neck-deep in red ink whose students routinely scored at or near the bottom on standardized tests. The federal government raised questions in 2008 about the district’s $53 million in spending. 

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) — A western Michigan city has been selected to receive a $5.1 million federal water infrastructure improvement grant to help pay for lead service line replacement. The Environmental Protection Agency says the funding also will support public engagement in Grand Rapids on the risks of lead in drinking water. Both goals are part of the city’s strategic plan. The grant will help fund 1,700 lead service line replacements in the coming years, in addition to 603 replacements currently planned in Grand Rapids’ fiscal year 2021 budget. Since 2017, the city has replaced more than 1,500 lead service lines during construction projects and through emergency leak replacements.