Here is the latest Michigan news from The Associated Press at 3:40 a.m. EST

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — A Washtenaw County woman is the first person in Michigan diagnosed with the COVID-19 variant, SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.7. Officials say the variant was identified Saturday by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services Bureau of Laboratories. The woman, whose name and age were not released, recently had traveled to the United Kingdom. Washtenaw County is west of Detroit. Close contacts of the woman have been identified and are in quarantine. Officials said two new cases have been identified from close contacts, but it is not known if they are infected with the variant.

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Airbnb says it will review reservations in Lansing ahead of expected demonstrations at Michigan’s state Capitol and may cancel bookings by anyone determined to be part of a hate group or who may have come to the city with violent intentions. The move comes as state government leaders across the U.S. prepare for potential protests ahead of President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration and follows the Jan. 6 storming of U.S. Capitol by supporters of President Donald Trump. San Francisco-based Airbnb said Wednesday that it would block or cancel all reservations in the Washington, D.C., area during the week of the inauguration. 

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) — A federal judge has set a March 23 trial date for six men charged with plotting to kidnap Michigan’s governor in what authorities say was a plot by anti-government extremists who were angry over her coronavirus policies. Chief U.S. District Judge Robert Jonker in Grand Rapids set the date Friday. The six defendants face a conspiracy charge that carries a maximum penalty of life in prison. Five of the six are from Michigan and the other lives in Delaware. They were arrested in early October following an FBI investigation into the alleged plot to kidnap Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer at her vacation home in northern Michigan.

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — One of the world’s longest-running wildlife field studies has fallen prey to the coronavirus pandemic. Since 1959, a research team has spent most of the winter observing the interplay between wolves and moose at Isle Royale National Park in Lake Superior. But Superintendent Denice Swanke said Friday that this year’s mission has been scrapped to protect the scientists and support personnel from possible exposure to the virus. The remote park is closed from Nov. 1 to April 15 and the winter researchers use a single cabin, which wouldn’t allow for social distancing. Scientists are trying to document how a mission to rebuild the wolf population that had declined in recent years is affecting the island ecosystem.