Here is the latest Michigan news from The Associated Press at 1:40 a.m. EST

UNDATED (AP) — A state scientist says Michigan’s rate of new COVID-19 cases has been dropping for more than 29 days. The state last week reported its lowest weekly new case total — 28,072 — since the end of October. The state reported a record total — 50,892 — during Nov. 15-21. Sarah Lyon-Callo, head of the epidemiology bureau, says social distancing will be important during the holiday season. Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s health department imposed a ban on indoor restaurant dining, in-person high school classes and other business restrictions. The dining ban remains in place through Jan. 15.

NEW YORK (AP) — Experts say the COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy at many hospitals. The procedure has helped doctors this year understand what coronavirus does to patients’ organs and how they might better treat some of the disease’s more baffling symptoms. At the same time, hospital autopsies remain far less common and much more under-resourced than they were 50 years ago. By demonstrating how a hospital’s morgue can help improve care in its ICUs, experts hope the pandemic could lead to something of a renaissance for the practice. Others are less certain about whether autopsies can fully rebound.

DETROIT (AP) — A woman has been charged with making threats against a Detroit-area Republican election official. The FBI says Monica Palmer received photos of a mutilated body, a day after after she had initially refused to certify local results in favor of Joe Biden. A criminal complaint was filed against Katelyn Jones. Monica Palmer chaired a raucous meeting of the Wayne County Board of Canvassers on Nov. 17. Palmer and a fellow Republican on the board initially refused to certify local election results, typically a routine step. They later changed their position. The FBI says Jones sent threats the next day from New Hampshire where she was staying with her mother.

FARGO, N.D. (AP) — A storm that began with snow, strong winds and bitter cold into the eastern Dakotas and western Minnesota and began moving east was making travel treacherous and grounded flights on one of the most anticipated air travel days since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. Blizzard warnings were posted in the region as National Weather Service officials called for wind chills to dip to 35 F (2 C) below zero, pushed by gusts of more than 60 mph (96.5 kph). Numerous travel advisories urged motorists to stay off the roads. The storm was centered in southeastern Minnesota and was expected to track steadily toward Eau Claire, Wisconsin and northern Michigan by Wednesday night. Flights were cancelled at airports from Fargo, North Dakota to the Twin Cities.