Here is the latest Michigan news from The Associated Press at 1:40 a.m. EDT

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Orders have been issued by the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services that allow for expanded visitations at nursing and other residential facilities. Visits to the facilities have been restricted to slow the spread of COVID-19. The two orders signed Tuesday by MDHHS Director Robert Gordon allow exceptions to the restrictions as long as the facilities meet specific safety requirements, such as requiring masks during visits. Gordon noted the hardship residents of the facilities have faced because they have been unable to see loved ones because of the pandemic. He says while visits are now allowed in come circumstances, caution and safety precautions should remain in place.

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan’s governor has unveiled her plans to return students to the classroom this fall for the first time since schools were closed in March in favor of remote learning to slow the spread of the coronavirus. Gov. Gretchen Whitmer told reporters Tuesday that the Safe Start plan requires districts to make safety plans in preparation for the upcoming school year and includes $256 million from the state to support those efforts. The plan lays out requirements and makes recommendations for districts to follow. Different stages are tied to Whitmer’s six-phase regional approach to economically reopening the state.

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — A board overseeing Michigan’s Capitol has determined that it has the legal authority to decide if guns will continue to be allowed in the Lansing building and on its grounds. The Michigan State Capitol Commission on Tuesday reviewed a formal legal opinion by Democratic Attorney General Dana Nessel that said the board had the power to prohibit firearms at the Capitol. In April, a number of people carrying guns took part in a protest at the Capitol over Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s orders that closing businesses to slow the spread of the coronavirus. Commissioners are scheduled to meet again on July 13.

Traverse City, Mich. (AP) — A Michigan regulatory agency has denied Enbridge’s request for quick approval of its plan to put a replacement oil pipeline beneath a Great Lakes channel. The state Public Service Commission on Tuesday voted to conduct a full review of Enbridge’s proposal. Enbridge wants to extend the pipeline through a tunnel that would be drilled beneath the Straits of Mackinac, connecting Lakes Huron and Michigan. It would replace dual Line 5 pipes that lie on the bottom of the straits. In a separate hearing, a state judge promises to rule soon on whether Line 5 can resume operating. The judge ordered the line shut down last week after damage was discovered to an anchor that supports one of the pipes.