Man Charged in Boy Scouts Investigation Found Competent to Stand Trial

Mark Chapman, the first person charged through an ongoing Boy Scouts of America investigation in Michigan, has been found competent to stand trial will be going back to court, according to Attorney General Dana Nessel.

Chapman, 51, of New York, was charged in Macomb County in March with eight counts of second-degree criminal sexual conduct and two counts of first degree criminal sexual conduct, all of which stem from alleged abuse against two victims.

He was involved in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints and the Boy Scouts of America at the time, according to the Department of the Attorney General.

Six of the second-degree CSC charges are related to alleged abuse that began in 2000 when the victim was 13 or 14. It continued until the victim was 17-years-old, and happened at his father’s house, Chapman’s house and at the local church, according to the Department of the Attorney General.

Two remaining counts of second-degree CSC, as well as both of the first-degree CSC charges, are related to a secondary case in which a family member alleged abuse by Chapman. It started when the victim was 11-years-old, and is said to have happened for years, often revolving around times that were designated as special opportunities for Chapman to spend time with the victim.

On the case of first-degree CSC, Chapman was not given bond. However, on the case of second-degree CSC charges, Chapman’s bond was set at $300,000 cash/surety.

A new probable cause conference has been scheduled for June 29.

If you have information about the Boy Scouts of America that you think would help, contact the investigation tip line at 844-324-3374 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.