Doppler 9&10 STEM: Static Electricity

Teachers & Parents:

Does your kid have a science question?

Have them send us a video with a weather question to weather@9and10news.com!

We are less than a week away from Severe Weather Awareness Week, so the STEM Duo decided to put electricity to the test…. but not quite the power of lightning. Static electricity and how i’s charges can cause items to “float”. This is why your hair stands up due to a thunderstorm nearby.

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  • Rubber Balloons
  • Scissors
  • Plastic Bags

A Few Easy Steps

  1. Cut the grocery bag into the shape of a ring
  2. Blow up a ballon
  3. Rub the balloon on your hair (balloon gains electrons)
  4. Rub the grocery bag on your head
  5. Place the ballon upward and the bag above it
  6. Wow, it is like magic!

The science

Opposing forces leading to the “floating”. As you know, opposites attract. That is why a negative charge attracts to a positive charge and creates an electrical current. The opposite is also true when talking about homogeneous electric charges, two positives or two negatives. A positive charge will repel or deflect a positive charge, while the negative repels a negative.

If your hair is standing up on a stormy day, you better get inside. A storm with lightning is on its way.

If your kiddos try this experiment, send us photos of you and your experiment and you might get to see it during weather on The Four on Tuesdays!

Make sure you tune in every Tuesday for a New 9&10 STEM. Send us an email at weather@9and10news.com or find us on Facebook and at Doppler 9&10 Weather Team if you have a weather question or want something in science explained! It does not have to be weather-related! Anything Science or math-based we’ve got you! You can always get the latest forecast on 9and10news.com/weather as well as interact with us on social media!

 

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Categories: Doppler 9&10 STEM, the four