Cheboygan Co. Sheriff’s Department Urging Facebook Likes for Free AEDs

"It is a win-win. There’s no cost to the taxpayers, but there’s value in saving lives," Cheboygan County Sheriff’s Department Undersheriff Tim Cook said.

The Cheboygan County Sheriff’s Department is trying to get new defibrillators and they’re turning to Northern Michigan for help.

The department is working with a company called HeartSmart.com in Connecticut.

They could land free Automated External Defibrillators (AED) just from getting likes on Facebook.

The Cheboygan Undersheriff says the devices can save lives, but the ones they have now are old and need to be replaced.

9 & 10’s Blayke Roznowski and photojournalist Noah Jurik talked to the deputy who helped save a woman’s life using an AED and explains how you can help.

"I was dispatched to a female that had collapsed on a beach in Cheboygan County," Cheboygan County Sheriff’s Office Deputy Darren LaChapelle said. "Upon arriving, I was advised that she was possibly having a heart attack." 

Deputy LaChapelle’s quick response with an AED likely saved a woman’s life in the summer of 2014.

"After shocking her she did regain consciousness and, I believe, made a full recovery," Deputy LaChapelle said.

The Cheboygan County Sheriff’s Department AEDs are more than a decade old.

Now, they’re trying to get brand new, $1,800 models for free.

"HeartSmart out of Connecticut is gracious enough to partner with organizations to get the public and the citizens involved and do these Facebook likes," Undersheriff Cook said. 

You can help by going to the HeartSmart.com Facebook page and hitting like.

Then make a post that says "Cheboygan County Sheriff’s Department Shock For Life."

For every 1,000 likes, they get a free AED.

"Our goal is to, at least, get four AEDs, so we need 4,000 likes," Undersheriff Cook said. "We need the community to really pull together."

Heart experts like Dr. Thomas Earl at McLaren Northern Michigan say the sooner someone gets help during cardiac arrest, the better.

"Patients will often times become acutely ill, unresponsive and lose a pulse or an effective heart beat and in that situation, seconds, minutes are critical," Dr. Earl said. 

"We want to bring these AEDs to the community so we have the equipment that we need to assist the public," Undersheriff Cook said.