New Multi-million Dollar Building Opens Doors For Students Futur - Northern Michigan's News Leader

New Multi-million Dollar Building Opens Doors For Students Futures

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A new multi-million dollar building is helping turn students into scientists.

Central Michigan University has opened its new biosciences building.

After two years of construction, January is the first month of classes in their new $95 million bioscience building.

CMU PhD candidate, Rachel Hackett tells us, “At the old building a lot of things were retrofitted not quite designed for the purpose we needed them for but here we could start from scratch and also thing about possible future needs.”

Much of the new building is glass to as architect Caz Zalewski says, create an atmosphere that makes everyone feel involved, “so there's kinda this central thoroughfare through this space that's ultimately trying to connect campus to everything that's going on in this building.”

The theme of the building is connectivity it sits in the middle of campus acting as one of its’ main arteries.

The research labs look into the teaching labs, creating a flow of knowledge.

Zalewski also points out that when building the structure they made sure it was environmentally friendly, “This has been designed to exceed the requirements of the energy code by 25%.”

It’s new research facilities include new aquarium, temperature controlled laboratories, a multi-purpose auditorium, and new specialty microscopes.

“This kind of hands on training is exactly what employers and graduate programs are looking for,” says CMU Biology Professor, Jennifer Schisa.

“Our students can get hands on training on this microscope which is a confocal microscope as well as the transmission electron microscope and the scanning electron microscope and that's really unusual program to allow students that kind of hands on training.”

The specialty research labs are opening new doors for students today and tomorrow.

“It's not easy to run this kind of program because you have to have pretty small sized classes but we think it's worth it and when we see the kinds of positions our students have and the success they have with their careers we're thrilled and this I what we're all about,” says Schisa.

The bioscience building is the largest capital project in the university's history and is expected to dramatically improve the quality and quantity of active learning for the sciences.